press

Press Kit

Please download a copy of Boris's revised 2015 press kit. (PDF, 282KB)

Please download a copy of Boris's press kit. (PDF, 2.8MB)

New Mexico Magazine feature on Boris by Pat Toomay, December 2013. (PDF, 582KB)

Press Images

The Salt Licks trio, photo by James Hart
Photo #1 (616KB) credit: James Hart
Boris & The Mighty Salt Licks, photo by Jim Cox
Photo #12 (1.6MB) credit: Jim Cox
The Salt Licks trio, photo by Melissa Totten
Photo #13 (1.2MB) credit: Melissa Totten

Photo #2 (1.9MB) credit: James Hart

Photo #3 (1.8MB) credit: James Hart

Photo #4 (1.9MB) credit: Renate Beense

Photo #5 (2.8MB) credit: Renate Beense

Photo #6 (1.3MB) credit: Anne Staveley

Photo #7 (2.6MB) credit: Anne Staveley

Photo #8 (1.3MB) credit: Jennifer Guerin

Photo #9 (813KB) credit: Jennifer Guerin

Photo #10 (1.5MB) credit: Melissa Totten

Photo #11 (136KB) credit: Melissa Totten

Selected Quotes

  • McCutcheon’s painfully genuine and refreshingly innocent observations on everyday life expose the softer side of an outwardly rugged, hard-working man. He just may be the last of his kind.

    —Kyle Eustice, Santa Fe Reporter

  • Anyone who hears Volcanic Wind and doesn't begin to vibrate from the solar plexus outward surely has no soul. The song, the first track off Boris and the Salt Licks' monumental 2005 Cactusman vs. the Blue Demon, features not only the band's slick musicianship... but also the gruff yet sweet, rustic yet careful vocals of McCutcheon himself.

    —Charlotte Jusinski, Santa Fe Reporter

  • The essential chaos, the human nexus of it, was Boris himself, Boris of the broken trucks and disconnected phones, of the lost capos, of the songs scrawled feverishly on the backs of receipts smeared with motor oil and stashed in the tackle box with his harmonicas.

    —Steve Almond, Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life

  • McCutcheon's songs are sometimes somber, sometimes exuberant, sometimes sardonic.

    —Steve Terrell

  • With a name like Boris, you'd better be good at whatever it is you do. Fortunately for Boris McCutcheon, he's more than good at what he does, which is desert folkcore—Americana with a Southwestern bent and a railyard twist, what Howe Gelb might do some night amoung the saguaro with a hit of acid and a Neil Young bug up his ass.

    Alibi

  • Flying in and around Boris's sometimes sad, introspective and peace-finding lyrics are a whirlwind of rusty sounding instruments that grind like buzzards across the steam rising from the vocals—from sharp old-school plate-reverberated guitars (which were perhaps plugged into a cactus) to tin shed slide guitars, dusty harmonicas and banjos. McCutcheon certainly is a musical vanguard in his own right—he tosses ego out the window and equally marries acoustics, thoughts, and traditional instruments into a tried, tested and proven genre of music and breathes new life into it. (Cactusman)

    Wood, Wires and Whiskey

  • One of his greatest skills is his ability to use that connection (with nature) as inspiration, but without sounding earthy. His songs are genuine, never contrived, and damn good—every one of them…all his songs have rich instrumental arrangements and McCutcheon's throaty voice, which somehow manages to be gruff and soothing at the same time. His music is frequently described as rootsy, but his sound is unique and original. McCutcheon writes rich, wonderful songs, is a skilled musician and has a voice like no one else.

    —Ross Burns, Five Magazine

  • I’m also trying to get across that Boris is a soul singer, someone who draws on the traditions of gospel and R&B, even if the arrangements place him in the vast hinterlands of Americana. It’s like he’s found some hidden trove from the Smithsonian Folkways series and run them through a Motown filter.

    —Steve Almond, Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life